TWO ELIZABETHS

CATE BLANCHETT AS ELIZABETH I AND ELIZABETH WARREN (FOR REAL) (Shutterstock)

Lacey Baldwin Smith has written that “Tudor portraits bear about as much resemblance to their subjects as elephants to prunes.” A slight exaggeration, maybe. But it is true that the historical accuracy of the depictions in Tudor portraits, particularly of royalty, was often at war with “symbolic iconizing” — the use of imagery to represent the person’s character, position or role. The symbolism could include inscriptions, emblems, mottos, relationships with…

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Cultural historian, media critic, feminist scholar. Website: bordocrossings.com

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Susan Bordo

Susan Bordo

Cultural historian, media critic, feminist scholar. Website: bordocrossings.com

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